Saturday, May 31, 2014

THE CAVEMAN DIET

Looking for a diet that will stave off cancer, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, obesity, osteoporosis, and type 2 diabetes? Then this is the diet for you. Simple, easy to follow, and frees your body of toxins producing an efficient human specimen. I came across this one and decided to share.

The Paleolithic (Paleo or Caveman) diet consists mainly of fish, grass-fed pasture-raised meats, eggs, vegetables, fruit, fungi, roots, and nuts, and excludes what are perceived to be agricultural products: grains, legumes, dairy products, potatoes, refined salt, refined sugar, and processed oils. 

Since the end of the Paleolithic period, several foods that we humans rarely or never consumed during previous stages of our evolution have been introduced as staples in our diet. 

With the advent of agriculture and the beginning of animal domestication roughly 10,000 years ago, during the Neolithic Revolution, humans started consuming large amounts of dairy products, beans, cereals, alcohol, and salt. 

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, the Industrial Revolution led to the large-scale development of mechanized food processing techniques and intensive livestock farming methods, which enabled the production of refined cereals, refined sugars, and refined vegetable oils, as well as fattier domestic meats, which have become major components of Western diets.

Such food staples have fundamentally altered several key nutritional characteristics of the human diet since the Paleolithic era, including glycemic load, fatty acid composition, macronutrient composition, micronutrient density, acid-base balance, sodium-potassium ratio, and fiber content.

These changes in composition of our diet have been theorized as risk factors in the pathogenesis of many of the so-called diseases of civilization and other chronic illnesses that have dramatically increased in prevalence since the end of World War II, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, autoimmune diseases, colorectal cancer, myopia, acne, depression, and diseases related to vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

Feel like it's time to get back to basics? Here's what to eat and what not to eat on this diet:

EAT:
Grass-produced meats
Fish/seafood
Fresh fruits and veggies
Eggs
Nuts and seeds
Healthful oils (Olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado, coconut)


DON’T EAT:
Cereal grains
Legumes (including peanuts)
Dairy
Refined sugar
Potatoes
Processed foods
Salt
Refined vegetable oils

TIPS TO MAKE THE PALEO DIET A ROUTINE PART OF YOUR LIFESTYLE:

For breakfast, make an easy omelet. Sauté onion, peppers, mushrooms, and broccoli in olive oil; add omega-3-enriched or free-range eggs and diced turkey or chicken breast.

Paleo lunches are easy. At the beginning of the week, make a huge salad with anything you like. A good starting point can be mixed greens, spinach, radishes, bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots, avocadoes, walnuts, almonds and sliced apples or pears. Store the salad in a large sealable container. Each morning prepare a single serving from the large batch and then mix in meat (ground beef, beef slices, chicken, turkey, ground bison, pork chunks, etc.) or seafood of choice (salmon, shrimp, tuna, or any fresh fish or seafood). Toss with olive oil and lemon juice and you are set.

For dinner, try spaghetti squash as a substitute for any pasta recipe. Top with pesto, marinara and meatballs. Roasted beets and their greens make a great side dish for pork. Asparagus, broccoli, and spinach can be steamed quickly. Salmon, halibut, or other fresh fish filets grill well with accompanying foil packs full of cut veggies with olive oil and garlic.

Berries and other succulent fruits make a great dessert. Pre-cut carrot and celery sticks, sliced fruit, and pre-portioned raw nut/dried fruit mixes are easy snacks.


Breakfast: Omega-3 or free ranging eggs scrambled in olive oil with chopped parsley. Grapefruit, or any fresh fruit in season, herbal tea

Snack: Sliced lean beef, fresh apricots or seasonal fruit

Lunch: Caesar salad with chicken (olive oil and lemon dressing), herbal tea

Snack: Apple slices, raw walnuts

Dinner: Tomato and avocado slices; grilled skinless turkey breast; steamed broccoli, carrots, and artichoke; bowl of fresh blueberries, raisins, and almonds; one glass white wine or mineral water. You are allowed to consume three non-Paleo meals per week.

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Please follow the links below to inform yourself of the importance of vitamin B12.

For more information just click on the links below.


www.thepaleodiet.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleolithic_diet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_B12_deficiency
http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/guide/vitamin-b12-deficiency-symptoms-causes
http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/vitamin-b12-deficiency-can-be-sneaky-harmful-201301105780
http://1000wordserless.blogspot.ca/2014/03/about-food.html